Why we joined the Lutheran Church

The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod teaches the true gospel


Dave's confession

Why I believe the Lutheran Church
The Lutheran confessions, from the Ecumenical Creeds to the Formula of Concord, proclaim Christ crucified without corrupting that apostolic message by the traditions and trends of human philosophy.
Addendum: Do clear Scriptures interpret unclear Scriptures, or are all Scriptures so unclear that they require authoritative human interpreters?
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Evelyn's confession

Why I am a Lutheran: Evelyn's Path to the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod

In what... ways has believing the Scriptures instead of human interpretations been important in your own struggle against the world, the flesh, and the devil?
I think that once a seed of doubt is planted in the mind, a tree of doubt can grow in little time. By believing the Scriptures to be both true and clearly read and interpreted..., I see that I do not doubt my salvation as often or as strongly as I once did. By thinking that the passages on baptism and the Lord's Supper were to be interpreted symbolically, I wondered what other Scriptures were supposed to be interpreted symbolically. As a result, I always felt a pressing, urgent need to hear a variety of scholarly pastors and read a large array of books on Scripture and the Christian life so that I could learn from these sources and have them interpret Scripture for me. I hoped that by doing these things..., I could then understand more symbolism I had not been taught and be sure I understood what varying passages in the Scriptures really meant. Believing the Scriptures are clear has helped me in two ways. First, ...

Comparison


Chart explanation: The chief difference between Reformed theology and Lutheran theology



Imagine

Imagine a church that is both evangelical—proclaiming the free forgiveness of sins through faith in Jesus Christ—and sacramental, centering its spiritual life in the regenerating waters of baptism and the Real Presence of Christ in Holy Communion. Imagine further a church that is strongly grounded on Scripture, but yet avoids the solipsism of individual interpretation in favor of a comprehensive, intellectually rigorous and eminently orthodox theological system. Imagine a worship service that features both strong preaching and the historic liturgy. Imagine that this is a historical church with a rich spiritual tradition, but without legalism. Imagine, in short, a church that has some of the best parts of Protestantism and the best parts of Catholicism. Finally, imagine that this church body is not some little made-up sect, but one of the largest bodies of Christians in the world... The Lutheran synthesis is a baroque structure that can only be held together by a doctrinal rigor that constantly reinforces every point. Anglicans attempt a via media between Catholicism and Protestantism, which works through compromise, broad consensus, and a tolerance for differences. The Lutheran way, on the other hand, is one of polarities. Each pole of the paradox must be maintained and heightened. What Chesterton said in Orthodoxy of the paradoxes of Christianity is particularly descriptive of Lutheran theology: "We want not an amalgam or compromise, but both things at the top of their energy; love and wrath both burning." Christianity does not approach doctrinal issues, such as the nature of Christ or the moral status of a human being, in terms of the Aristotelian golden mean. Rather, "Christianity got over the difficulty of combining furious opposites, by keeping them both, and keeping them both furious." Thus, Lutherans are very sacramental and very evangelical... Many confessional Lutherans have taken to calling themselves "evangelical catholics." They are catholic in their historic creeds, their worship, and their sacramentalism, and they are evangelical in their trust in the good news of Christ, that in his cross he has saved us by sheer grace for a life of Christian freedom.
—Gene Edward Veith, "The First Evangelicals and Other Churches," in The Spirituality of the Cross: The Way of the First Evangelicals (1999, Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, 113-124)



Links to other articles


The Christian Church

Eternal election



Short answers from the web site of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod


Q & A on the denominations and other topics

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Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Ghost; as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

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Dawning Realm proclaims the good news of the kingdom as confessed at Caesarea Philippi, Nicaea, and Augsburg.
This cross symbol, when appearing to the left of a topic, designates a category in Theology of the Cross, a directory of Lutheran articles.
Last modified: January 16, 2016 9:25 AM
Author information. David Bickel confesses the Nicene Creed, the Athanasian Creed, the Augsburg Confession, and the other documents of the Book of Concord because they faithfully summarize the sacred writings of the prophets and apostles. As a layman, he lacks the call needed to publicly teach in the church. | professional web page

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